Outer court and bell tower two meters below street level.

The Greek Orthodox Cathedral of St. Saba (ALEXANDRIA)

The Greek Orthodox Cathedral of St. Saba (ALEXANDRIA) THE CATHEDRAL OF ST. SABA is situated on Greek Patriarchate Street. St. Saba (439-532) was a native of Mutalaska in Cappadocia, Turkey. In 478 he founded a monastic settlement in Wadi al-Nar between Jerusalem and the Dead Sea. He was a strong supporter of the doctrines promulgated […]

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Music

MUSIC The Coptic Church uses more than one tune. The yearly tune, is used for all days except some feasts, fasting, and other occasions. The tune of Joy (Faraihi) is used from the first day of Tut, the beginning of the year, until the feast of the Cross, then in the dominical feasts and in […]

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Catechumen

CATECHUMEN In the early church, a new Jewish or heathen convert undergoing a course of basic instruction and training in Christian doctrine and ritual, prior to BAPTISM and full incorporation into the body of the faithful. Just before His ascension, Christ had entrusted to the disciples the task of propagating His teachings among all nations […]

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Second Council Of Constantinople

SECOND COUNCIL OF CONSTANTINOPLE Known as the fifth general council and convoked by Emperor Justinian I in May 553. It was presided over by Patriarch Eutychius of Constantinople, and attended by 165 bishops, nearly all from the eastern and Greek-speaking provinces of Justinian’s empire. The main object of the council was to modify (without appearing […]

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Gregory Of Nazianzus (329-389)

GREGORY OF NAZIANZUS (329-389) A Saint, theologian, and bishop. Gregory was born near Nazianzus in Cappadocia. He was educated at Caesarea and Alexandria, where he became familiar with the works of Origen. After studying in Athens, he returned home, where he was baptized in 358. He was ordained a priest against his will in 362. […]

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Coptic Influence On European Art

COPTIC INFLUENCE ON EUROPEAN ART Of all the imports from the East to the West, Coptic monasticism is one of the most important. The spread of the monastic phenomenon (its institution and spirituality) is evident from clear landmarks. Several Christian monuments in the West have led to the notion that this expansion spread into the […]

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Arianism

ARIANISM A doctrine derived originally from a priest of the church of Alexandria named ARIUS (c. 270-336). It concentrated mainly on the status of the Son within the godhead, and held that he had originated at some point by the creative act of the Father’s will. Arius at first held that the Son had been […]

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Ulphilas (C. 311-381)

ULPHILAS (c. 311-381) The Apostle of the Goths, who was responsible for the conversion of the Goths to Arian Christianity (see ARIANISM). According to the ecclesiastical historian Philostorgius (Historia ecclesiastica 2.5), the Goths descended on the eastern provinces of the empire and crossed the Bosporus to Asia Minor and Cappadocia in the third century, during […]

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Julian The Apostate (332-363)

JULIAN THE APOSTATE (332-363) A roman emperor who attempted to restore the classical pantheon. Julian was born in Constantinople, son of Julius Constantius and Basilina. With his half-brother Gallus, he survived the massacre that claimed many of the relatives of Emperor Constantine I on 9 September 337, including their father and elder brother. Julian was, […]

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Copto-Arabic Synaxarion

COPTO-ARABIC SYNAXARION A list of saints used in the Coptic church Editions of the Synaxarion This book, which has become a liturgical book, is very important for the history of the Coptic church. It appears in two forms: the recension from Lower Egypt, which is the quasi-official book of the Coptic church from Alexandria to […]

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