Vaulte – Architectural Elements Of Churches

Vault A vault is a ceiling or roof, traditionally of stone or brick, that depends on the principle of the arch. It may be executed in various geometrical shapes depending, to some extent, on the shape of the area to be covered. The arrangement of the blocks (bond) is determined by whether the vault is […]

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Triumphal Arche – Architectural Elements Of Churches

Triumphal Arch A triumphal arch is a freestanding structure in Roman architecture and the arch at the entrance to the apse in church architecture. From the second century A.D., the Romans built arches to commemorate some extraordinary political event or the outstanding achievements of some exalted personage. Such arches frequently stood astride a road and […]

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Triconche – Architectural Elements Of Churches

Triconch A triconch is a square, oblong, or circular room expanded on three sides by semicircular exedrae, most frequently covered by a semidome. In the oldest examples, the central room is unroofed, as in the Well of Herodes Atticus in Corinth (second century A.D.). Later it usually had a wooden saddleback or barrel-vaulted roof. Very […]

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Tribelone – Architectural Elements Of Churches

Tribelon A tribelon, meaning “three curtains,” is a passage divided by two columns, whose resulting three openings can be closed by three curtains. The central opening is, as a rule, slightly larger than the two side ones. The tribelon occurs sporadically in some pharaonic tomb entrances, for example, in several rock tombs at Bani Hasan […]

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Tetraconche – Architectural Elements Of Churches

Tetraconch A tetraconch is a square or oblong room expanded on all four sides by semicircular rooms formed by a portico or open recess (conchas, or exedrae). The origin of the tetraconch is a matter of debate. Numerous examples suggest Syria or Asia Minor, but the Church of San Lorenzo is a fourth-century example from […]

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Synthronone – Architectural Elements Of Churches

Synthronon A synthronon is the bench for the clergy against the east wall of the apse of a church. Since the apse is usually semicircular, it is usually semicircular. It is made up of an elevated bishop’s throne in the center between subsellia (low seats) for other clergy. Thus it is the mark of a […]

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Sanctuarye – Architectural Elements Of Churches

Sanctuary The sanctuary (Arabic, haykal) is the area around the altar. The term derives from the Hebrew hekal, the main hall in the Temple in Jerusalem, which lay in front of the inaccessible Holy of Holies. The Arabic term is first used in the HISTORY OF THE PATRIARCHS by Sawirus Ibn al-Muqaffa‘. Older synonyms are […]

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Saddleback Roofe – Architectural Elements Of Churches

Saddleback Roof A saddleback roof (Arabic, jamalun) is a pitched roof that slopes on two sides from a ridgepole to the top of a wall. It has been used since antiquity, especially in rainy areas, to cover buildings with a broad span. In Egypt, saddleback roofs were constructed over basilicas until the Fatimid period, when […]

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Sacristye – Architectural Elements Of Churches

Sacristy A sacristy is a side room in a church for sacred vessels and vestments and for the vesting of the clergy. It is also called a vestry. Because vessels and vestments are often valuable, the room usually contains wall niches or cupboards that can be closed or locked. One room with wall niches in […]

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Roofe – Architectural Elements Of Churches

Roof A roof is the top covering of a building and its supporting frame. It may be flat, saddleback (pitched), or vaulted. In Egypt since earliest times, the flat roof was preferred. Probably from the Hellenistic period, saddleback roofs were used only for buildings that had an unusually wide span, such as classical temple complexes, […]

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