Ammonius

“Twenty Thousand Nuns” The Domestic Virgins of Oxyrhynchos

“Twenty Thousand Nuns” The Domestic Virgins of Oxyrhynchos Historia Monachorum in Oxyrhynchos The Historia Monachorum in Aegypto contains a literary testimony of Chris­tians in the city of Oxyrhynchos.[1] Its anonymous author, an eyewitness from Palestine writing at the turn of the fifth century, boasts that this city in Middle Egypt abounds with monasteries, both within …

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Bishop

BISHOP The Coptic term episkopos is a loan word from the Greek that can be translated bishop, overseer, superintendent, or supervisor. The Arabic usquf derives also from the Greek episkopos. According to the Didascalia, the bishop should be chosen by the congregation, and his consecration should take place on a Sunday in the presence of …

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Coptic Hagiography

COPTIC HAGIOGRAPHY Egypt was influenced by the Greek culture, hence many of the hagiographical texts were written first in this language and translated later into Coptic. It is important to use the classical hagiographical tools such as Bibliotheca Hagiographica Orientalis and the Bibliotheca Sanctorum (16 vols., Rome 1965-1976), in addition to the bibliography in each …

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Tmuis

TMUIS A city in the Eastern Delta, now known as Tall ‘Abd al-Salam. It lies southwest of the village of Timay in the province of Daqahliyyah approximately 12 miles (19 km) southeast of al- MANSURAH. Tmuis was one of the first Christian cities of Egypt. Ammonius was bishop of Tmuis before the middle of the …

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Hermitage

HERMITAGE The lodging or dwelling house of a hermit, “one living in the desert,” or anchorite, “one living far removed.” They were probably at first only single-roomed huts that were built, according to geographical circumstances, of stone, wood, or bricks; but at an early time they had already developed into houses with several rooms. Early …

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