AELRED CODY

Scetis

SCETIS A name that historically designated the area of monastic settlement extending about 19 miles (30 km) through the shallow valley known in the medieval period as Wad Habb, now called Wad al-Natrun, which runs southeast to northwest through the Western or Libyan Desert, about 40 miles (65 km) southwest of the Nile Delta. In …

Scetis Read More »

Coptic Calendar

COPTIC CALENDAR Early Egyptian Christians, like those elsewhere, took systems of reckoning time used in the world that they knew, modified them, and adapted them to their own observances and practices. The civil day of Christians in Egypt began in the morning, as did that of the ancient Egyptians and the Romans; but their liturgical …

Coptic Calendar Read More »

Gregorian Calendar

GREGORIAN CALENDAR A reform of the Julian calendar (see CALENDAR, JULIAN) was promulgated by Pope Gregory XIII in his bull Inter gravissimas of 24 February 1582. The commission that he had named with this in mind ultimately adopted most of the details of the project drawn up by a Calabrian astronomer, Luigi Giglio Ghiraldi (Aloysius …

Gregorian Calendar Read More »

Julian Calendar

JULIAN CALENDAR The Roman adaptation of the Egyptian solar calendar introduced by Julius Caesar, with the technical aid of the Alexandrian astronomer Sosigenes, in 46 B.C.; that year was extended to 445 days by intercalation in order to bring the civic year into line with the solar year. While the Egyptians divided the solar year …

Julian Calendar Read More »

Dayr Al-Baramus

DAYR AL-BARAMUS History This monastery is farthest to the northwest in the monastic colony of Wadi al-Natrun (ancient Scetis). The topographic allusions in ancient literature lend some credence to the statement by the author of the Coptic Life of Saint Macarius (probably of the eighth century; cf. Guillaumont, 1968-1969, pp. 182-83) that Dayr al-Baramus evolved …

Dayr Al-Baramus Read More »

Anaphora Of Saint Basil

ANAPHORA OF SAINT BASIL Anaphora normally used in the Coptic church, and one of the three retained in Coptic service books when others were abandoned in the Middle Ages. The expression “Anaphora of Saint Basil” is used to designate either (1) that anaphora within its strict limits (from the dialogue introducing the eucharistic prayer to …

Anaphora Of Saint Basil Read More »

Anaphora Of Saint Cyril

ANAPHORA OF SAINT CYRIL The most typically Egyptian of the three anaphoras retained in the euchologion of the Coptic church. It is basically the same as the anaphoric part of the Greek Liturgy of Saint Mark that was formerly used in the Melchite church of Alexandria. Although it is regularly called the Anaphora of Saint …

Anaphora Of Saint Cyril Read More »

Anaphora Of Saint Gregory

ANAPHORA OF SAINT GREGORY One of the three anaphoras retained by the Coptic church in its service books. In the manuscript tradition, followed by modern printed editions, the anaphora in the strict sense (from the beginning of the eucharistic prayer to the doxology before the fraction and Lord’s Prayer) is supplemented by certain prayers preceding …

Anaphora Of Saint Gregory Read More »

Dayr Anba Bishoi (Scetis)

DAYR ANBA BISHOI (Scetis) History This is one of the surviving ancient monasteries in SCETIS (modern Wadi al-Natrun). There is no historically reliable information on its foundation, but on the basis of what little is known of the earliest monastic establishments in Scetis, it may be surmised that it grew from a settlement, or laura, …

Dayr Anba Bishoi (Scetis) Read More »