Coptic art in the Coptic museum

Coptic art in the Coptic museum Coptic art began to emerge in Egypt around 300 A.D. In form, style, and content it was quite different from the art of Pharaonic Egypt. How’ did this come about? Broadly speaking, there were two causes. The first is that indigenous Egyptian art had been in contact with the […]

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Pachomius and the White Monastery

Pachomius and the White Monastery IN THE fiRST volume of the Oxford History of the Christian Church, entitled The Church in Ancient Society: From Galilee to Gregory the Great and published in 2001, Henry Chadwick included the following brief paragraph on Shenoute in his chapter on “Monks: The Ascetic Life.” In the fifth century the […]

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The Ancient Rules of Shenoute’s Monastic Federation

The Ancient Rules of Shenoute’s Monastic Federation WORK IS NOW well under way to produce a critical edition of Shenoute’s vast work entitled Canons. My own editorial task is volumes 4 and 5 of the Canons. Now, this title—Canons—is a bit odd. In Christian usage of the Greek language, ‘canons’—kanones—meant ‘rules’ or ‘laws,’ and so […]

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Monks and Scholars in the Panopolite Nome: The Epigraphic Evidence

Monks and Scholars in the Panopolite Nome: The Epigraphic Evidence DURING THE CONFERENCE “Perspectives on Panopolis,” which took place in Leyden in 1998, Lucia Criscuolo discussed the evidence of the Greek inscriptions, including Christian ones, from the Panopolite nome, the present-day Sohag-Akhmim area. Already in the beginning of her paper, she observed that it would […]

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The Red Monastery (SOHAG)

The Red Monastery (SOHAG) THE MONASTERY OF ST. PSHAI is more commonly known as the Red Monastery (al-Dayr al-Ahmar). The historian al-Maqrizi (d. 1442) used this name, explaining that it was built of red bricks.96 Saint Pshai was a hermit and companion of St. Bigul, St. Shenute’s uncle. As a young boy, Shenute (d. ca. […]

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An illuminated liturgical manuscript.

The Monasteries of Naqada (NAQADA)

The Monasteries of Naqada (NAQADA) SIX MONASTIC SETTLEMENTS SURVIVE TO THE SOUTHWEST OF NAQADA at the edge of the cultivated land and the desert. They trace their roots to the sixth century, when the area, known as the Mountain of Benhadab or Tsenti, was populated with hermits and small monasteries. Traditionally, St. Pisentius (569-632) is […]

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