Eminent

Cyprian The Magician

CYPRIAN THE MAGICIAN The legend of Cyprian the Magician (perhaps mid-fourth century with further development at a later period) tells how a young man in Antioch approaches Cyprian so that with magic he can win the love of the Christian virgin Justina. But all the magical arts are frustrated by prayer and by the sign …

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Cyriacus

CYRIACUS A Bishop of al-Bahnasa (Oxyrhynchus), assumed author of eight homilies. We have no historical evidence of either the existence of this person or the period in which he lived. On the latter, opinions greatly diverge: G. Graf (1944-1953, Vol. 1, p. 475) thinks that if one accepts what is said by the Ethiopian Book …

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Colluthus

COLLUTHUS A schismatic presbyter in Alexandria during the episcopate of ALEXANDER (312-326), nineteenth patriarch of the See of Saint Mark. In 324 the council convened by Hosius to quell the growing Arian controversy deposed Colluthus for taking upon himself the episcopal function of conferring orders. Ancient sources indicate that Colluthus was not a supporter of …

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Jean Cledat

JEAN CLEDAT (Périgueux, France, 7 May 1872-Bouch [Dordogne], France, 29 July 1943), French Egyptologist and Coptologist. He acquired a solid grounding in Paris (including the Ecole des Beaux Arts) and, in 1898 and 1899, published his first studies in Egyptology and Coptology that dealt with both the texts and the archaeology. Clédat arrived in Egypt …

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Yuhanna Chiftichi

YUHANNA CHIFTICHI A Coptic priest and scholar born in Cairo in the last quarter of the eighteenth century; died in France sometime after 1825. One hindrance to discovering his identity is due to the illegible spellings of his name by biographers of Champollion, to whom Chiftichi taught Coptic pronunciation. H. Hartleben (1906, Vol. 1, p. …

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Clement Caraccioli

CLEMENT CARACCIOLI A scribe of four Arabic manuscripts copied in Rome between 1712 and 1715. One of them (Vatican Library, Arabic 66) gives some autobiographical details (fol. 100) where the copyist wrote in Italian: “I Clement Caraccioli of Great Cairo, converted from Mohammedanism to the holy Catholic faith, wrote this blessed book in the Arabic …

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Carpocrates

CARPOCRATES An Alexandrian of the middle of the second century who was said to be a successor of CERINTHUS. Carpocrates, along with his followers, was attacked more for immoral practices than for doctrinal error. Aside from making a general charge concerning the nature of Christ and the identity of the creator of the world, IRENAEUS …

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Charisios

CHARISIOS The name of this archimandrite is preserved only by some fragments of the typica preserved at Leiden (Insinger, 38a, Pleyte and Boeser, 1897, p. 182), Vienna (K 9736), and Rome (Vatican, Borgia 231; Leipoldt, 1913, p. 11). Charisios has left no trace in the Copto-Arabic SYNAXARION; we know of his existence only from the …

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Celestinus Of Rome

CELESTINUS OF ROME A bishop of Rome (422-432) and the authority to whom NESTORIUS, bishop of Constantinople, and CYRIL I, bishop of Alexandria, appealed during their controversy over the term THEOTOKOS (430). Celestinus sided with Cyril, and thus caused the condemnation of Nestorius at a council held in Rome. The subsequent Council of EPHESUS later …

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Celsus

CELSUS An anti-Christian writer and Platonist philosopher whose Alethes Logos (True Discourse), written about 178, is the oldest surviving literary attack on Christianity. All that is known of its author is contained in ORIGEN’s reply, the eight books of Contra Celsum, written in Caesarea (Palestine) about 248. Celsus was most probably a Syrian, for he …

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